ADA Accessibility Information
Accessibility

A
A

A

COVID-19 OFFICE UPDATES



We are accepting emergency visits so that we can help you in any way we can.
Call our office you have are experiencing pain or have had a dental emergency.

We are opening back up on May 4th!

Learn More About Our Safety Measures

Risks of not Removing an Impacted Canine


Picture of boy who has impacted canineA canine tooth becomes impacted if it stays in the alveolar bone instead of erupting into the mouth. Impacted canine teeth can lead to considerable oral complications for adjacent teeth, bone, and tissues if they are not treated.

What Happens when Impacted Canine Teeth aren’t Treated?


Impacted canines can put stress on nearby teeth and nerves, causing damage and intense pain. If a canine tooth erupts later than usual, it will usually emerge facing the cheek or the palate.

Untreated, canine teeth can merge with the adjacent bone, and at that point, the only option is to remove the tooth and put a dental implant in its place. Unless these eruptions are detected and address in the early stages, they can cause further oral complications.

Resorption and Misalignment from Impacted Canine Teeth


When a permanent tooth erupts and replaces a baby tooth, the root of the baby tooth is worn down (or resorbed) by the incoming tooth. As a result, the baby tooth can fall out. This is what naturally happens. However, when canine teeth are impacted, their positions can cause problems.

Canines that are impacted palatally won’t resorb the roots of the baby teeth they’re meant to displace, causing the baby teeth to remain in place. Worse still, the improperly positioned canine can resorb the roots of a nearby tooth. If nothing is done, the damage to the surrounding tooth will advance to the point where we can’t restore it, and we will need to remove it.

Abnormal Growths caused by Impacted Canine Teeth


Abnormalities such as tumors and cysts can grow around impacted canine teeth if they aren’t treated. If a cyst forms around an impacted canine’s crown, it can force the surrounding teeth out of their natural positions. Such cysts can also lead to resorption of the alveolar bone. If the alveolar bone thins out too much due to resorption, pathological fracturing can result even from small amounts of force. Surrounding tooth roots can also suffer damage from these after-effects of an impacted canine.

Cysts or tumors that form near an impacted canine run the risk of infection, which in turn results in pain and swelling. These growths cause the jaw to become anemic if they resorb improperly. They also put strain on adjacent teeth, bones, and gums, hindering normal dental functions. If they are allowed to develop to an advanced stage, we will need to remove them via surgery.

Tooth Decay and Wear from Impacted Canine Teeth


A canine tooth can affect the health and operation of the rest of the mouth if it is impacted. Canine teeth also endure a good amount of the force during chewing, so if they become impacted the other teeth will have extra pressure placed on them and can get worn prematurely. The impacted canine can lead to misalignment and wear of other permanent teeth as well.

Impacted canines also run the risk of decay due because they aren’t getting proper oral care. If such a canine become afflicted with cavities, it can spread to nearby teeth. Impacted canines can also create pockets in the mouth that trap food, forming a location where bacteria can prosper and grow. If you are at risk of decay, you are also in danger of periodontitis. Contact us right away if you think one of your canine teeth has become impacted.

For more information, please contact our office at 817-678-7395.

GET IN TOUCH
WITH OUR OFFICE



301 Trophy Branch Dr., Suite 100, Trophy Club, TX 76262

New Patients


817-678-7395

Existing Patients


817-491-3344

Mon - Thur: 7am to 4pm
Rotating Fridays
View Our Schedule

icon border icon

OUR LOCATION


David Crumpton, DDS, serves families in Trophy Club, Roanoke, Keller, Southlake, Colleyville, Fort Worth, and across the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex.



Copyright © 2019-2020 David Crumpton, DDS and WEO Media (Touchpoint Communications LLC). All rights reserved.  Sitemap | Links